Politico learned about the possibility of compensation for Hungary in exchange for the embargo

The EU does not rule out providing compensation in exchange for Prime Minister Viktor Orban's support for the sixth package of sanctions, which includes an embargo on Russian oil, the newspaper writes. Previously, Orban compared the ban to the “atomic bomb” learned about the possibility of compensation for Hungary in exchange for the embargo” />

The EU may compensate Hungary by trying

enlist the support of Prime Minister Viktor Orban in imposing a sixth package of sanctions, including an embargo on Russian oil, writes Politico, citing three European officials.

Budapest may receive money under the new EU energy strategy, which should be formulated next week.

Earlier, Brussels proposed to give Hungary and Slovakia a delay until the end of 2024 to refuse Russian supplies. These countries are landlocked and heavily dependent on Russian raw materials. At the same time, the Czech Republic in the EU is ready to provide a deadline until the end of June 2024. However, Hungary said it needed more time to reduce its dependence on Russian energy resources. According to European officials, in order not to stretch the deadlines, the EU does not exclude that they can pay her, the newspaper notes.

Last week, the Hungarian prime minister said that Brussels had crossed a red line, intending to impose an embargo on Russian oil, and compared

a ban on supplies with “an atomic bomb that they want to drop on the Hungarian economy.”

Deputy Chairman of the Russian Security Council Dmitry Medvedev called Orban's refusal to support the embargo “a courageous step for a voiceless Europe.” According to him, Orban— one of the “most reasonable” leaders of the EU countries, who, apparently, “tired of quietly moving to the cliff along with the entire sterilized European herd” sent to the slaughter by the “American shepherd”.

The EU has not yet been able to agree on the rejection of Russian raw materials. They expect to abandon the import of Russian crude oil within six months, and oil products— by the end of 2022. According to the head of the European Commission, Ursula von der Leyen, the embargo will be part of a new package of sanctions against Russia.

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